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Ang Sila seafood market revisited

In spite of reports that the Ang Sila seafood market had been closed down in August (due to structural work to the pier) we decided to head over on December 5th and found it to still be thriving at the same location. The Ang Sila market sells extremely fresh and prepared fish and seafood, right on the local pier. Worth a visit for seafood lovers or anyone into authentic local markets. Pictures are available in this gallery.

 

 

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Life Hack: Quick Asian lunch top tip

In busy periods of time, I like to keep an assortment of frozen salapao and dim sum in the freezer. At lunch time, just pop a pot with water on the stove, make the water boil and put a steamer with these Asian treats on top. In about 10 minutes you’ve got a lovely meal if you add some lettuce and some sauce (I like Heinz’s Chili Sauce). The practical thing is that it is almost impossible to over-steam them … so it doesn’t matter if you are a bit late, taking them off. I prefer the salty varieties, but the sweet one’s make for a delicious desert. Available at any supermarket in Thailand or at Asian supermarkets, in the West.

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Review: Vineyards World Wines – Cabernet Sauvignon (Thailand)

Our guide to buying wine in Thailand, has had its first succes. Applying the guide to the selection of wines at the local Tesco Lotus supermarket resulted in an Australian Cabernet Sauvignon by the supermarket’s private label ‘Vineyards – World Wines’. The red wine is above acceptable, with just a little bit too much sweetness in the after-tast and a lack of body. Priced at 349 baht, it is just 50 baht more expensive than the local fruit wines and far superior. Shiraz and Merlot variants are available as well. Affordable, enjoyable and widely available in Thailand. Result.

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Ghost shrines

On the way from Phimai village center to our house, three small river-side buildings draw attention because of the many colorful statues they display. In fact, on my first few visits to the area I assumed that they were shops selling sculptures. After a few lunch-time motorcycle drive-by’s, I started noticing there never was a shopkeeper around. Asking around, they turn out to be shrines to river ghosts who are supposed to live around there. People make offerings to them, hoping for good luck and their wishes to come true. They are definitely not Buddhist, which probably makes them Animist. The Thai fascination with ghosts is a subject for a future post. More pictures are available in this gallery.